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The "Shame-Blame-Guilt Game"

This may seem like a strange thing for a priest to say, but nothing turns people into emotional wrecks quite aseffectively as religion.



It’s true. Of course, you have to keep in mind I’ve defined “religion” in a particular way (in my book, The 5 Pillars of Life) and that “religion” is not thesame as an “authentic ancient tradition of self-trans-formation”.

This comes from Philip, one of our members, who sent in this excellent question, preceeded by a couple of paragraphs from an article he had just read. Be sure you read it through first, then go to the bottom and turn up your speakers to find out the answer:



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This morning, I was leafing through a yoga magazine in anacupuncture waiting room when I came across an article that interested me. It was about guilt, and in it, the author distinguished 3 kinds of guilt: natural (feeling guilty about something immediate and specific, which can be repaired), toxic (festering of natural guilt, nagging, non-specific) and existential (not about anything we’ve done personally, or about the state we’re in, but rather about the state of something external (the poor, the environment, etc.)).



I’ll reproduce what the author had to say about the second category, “toxic guilt”:

“Toxic guilt is what happens when natural guilt festers. It manifests as a nagging feeling of pervasive but nonspecific badness, as if your whole life has something wrong with it. This type of free-floating guilt is the hardest kind to deal with, because it arises from lingering patterns, of samskaras, lodged in your subconscious.

“How can you expiate your sin or forgive yourself for something when you don’t know what it is you did – or when you believe that what you did is essentially irreparable? To some extent, this particular type of guilt seems to be an unintended by-product of Judeo-Christian culture, a residue of the doctrine of original sin.

“Tantric traditions especially are known for looking at the world through a lens that sees all life as fundamentally divine. Your attitude toward your guilt will undergo a huge change when you begin to follow a spiritual teaching that – instead of assuming human beings are intrinsically flawed – teaches you to look beyond your flaws and helps you to know your deeper perfection.”

(Philip goes on to say) I’m now reading “The Way of a Pilgrim” (an Eastern Orthodox spiritual classic from 19th century Russia, currently published by Shambhala). In it the author frequently refers to himself as “a sinner” and as being “unworthy”. According to the yoga author’s viewpoint, it would be hard to see his spiritual state as a healthy, evolved one, but rather it would seem benighted. At the same time, this character experiences life as wonder and joy, shows resilience to hardship, and never seems to feel sorry for himself, or “spiral into a pattern of self-destructive action”.

So what’s the truth here??

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Now turn up your speakers and I’ll tell you the TRUTH about all this. And it’s not likely what you’re expecting to hear šŸ˜‰



MP3 File

~ Dr. Symeon Rodger

Warrior Coaching International – transforming your mind, body and spirit into SOLID STEEL……wrapped in cotton šŸ˜‰





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